Christ-Centred Curriculum – Part 3

I have recently stepped down as Head Teacher at CFS. This is the last of three articles containing some reflections I have had about my teaching of History and Geography from a Christ Centred perspective. The material is adapted from a talk I gave recently at a Christian Teachers conference and I think the issues raised are useful to adults as well as young people.

My final observation is the one that gets me out of bed every morning. Throughout both geography and history there are many opportunities to reinforce to young people the wonderful truth that the Bible is an accurate revelation from God. During this lockdown I have taken time to produce a website where people can access my World History booklet plus some videos of my introducing aspects of the booklet. This booklet, which I recently revised, contains over thirty years of research into a number of topics – many of which I teach throughout KS3 & 4. The main aim of the booklet is to demonstrate that within the domains of Geology, Topography, Biology, Cosmology, History, Miracles and Fulfilled Prophecy there is abundant evidence to show that the Bible is an accurate revelation from God. The following is the website address:

https://sites.google.com/view/world-history-3967/home.

Before I finish I want to explain why I find the word ‘revelation’ so important. My preferred discipline is Philosophy and in that realm all knowledge is provisional, because we are finite and therefore we cannot know everything. As a consequence we cannot know what we don’t know and therefore we cannot know if what we think we know is true. The Bible warns us not to be hasty in judgement because only God knows the full truth and this is where the full significance of revelation comes in. For revelation from God, who knows everything and who cannot lie, is the only type of knowledge that is absolute and fixed, all other knowledge is provisional. This is why I get so excited about the Bible because it is that type of absolute knowledge, unlike the wisdom of this world. Therefore I can build my life on it, because, if the Bible says I am saved through the death and resurrection of Jesus, then I can fully believe that for myself and this wonderful truth is freely available to all – ‘For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son that whoever believes in Him shall not perish but have eternal life’.’


Christ-Centred Curriculum – Part 2

I have recently stepped down as Head Teacher at CFS. This is the second of three articles containing some reflections I have had about my teaching of History and Geography from a Christ Centred perspective. The material is adapted from a talk I gave recently at a Christian Teachers conference and I think the issues raised are useful to adults as well as young people.

My second observation is that with History I remind the students of what is often missing from their textbooks. In the case of the GCSE 1920-73 USA unit it is any reference to Christians or Christianity. Surprising when half the population went to church and it was a major factor in the civil rights movement. Very often Christianity has been airbrushed out of the history of the last 200 years. In fact we have a great story to tell. Vishal Mangalwadi, an Indian philosopher, in his book ‘The Book That Made Your World – How the Bible Created the Soul of Western Civilization’ describes how people who took the Bible seriously significantly influenced our modern understanding of service, our purpose in life, our sense of self, what it is to be human, rationality, heroism, morality, the importance of literature and education, our notion of true wealth, liberty and why we show compassion. It takes someone from a Hindu background to see the profound significance of the Bible in shaping western thinking. Peter Lupson, a member of the church I attend, has produced very well researched books that illustrate the practical impact of Christianity. Thank God for Football details how 12 of the clubs in 2006/7 Premiership League were started by churches in the 19th century – they include Aston Villa, Everton, Liverpool, Manchester City, Southampton and Tottenham Hotspur. With regard to the world of business, In God’s Company, he describes how the following businesses were started by men who loved God first and foremost but also loved their customers, their workers, their product, were scrupulously honest and extraordinarily generous, the companies were: Colgate, Thomas Cooks, Quaker Oats, Hartley’s Jam, Heinz, Kraft and Tropicana. With regard to missionaries in the 19th and 20th centuries there is an embarrassment of riches including more recent people such as Jackie Pullinger, Corrie Ten Boom, Brother Andrew and David Wilkerson. It was Christianity that provided many of the schools and hospitals that our modern world takes for granted and in many cases it was missionaries attempting to translate the Bible who created the written form of a significant number of the languages used in the world today. Christianity has definitely been a force for good and should not be airbrushed out of history – in fact its contributions should be celebrated.


Christ-Centred Curriculum – Part 1

I have recently stepped down as Head Teacher at CFS. This is the first of three articles containing some reflections I have had about my teaching of History and Geography from a Christ Centred perspective. The material is adapted from a talk I gave recently at a Christian Teachers conference and I think the issues raised are useful to adults as well as young people.

My first observation is than when dealing with sustainable development, climate change, flooding, poverty or town planning, young people are reminded that they are made in the image of God, and therefore they are born problem solvers. For the young their challenge is to go out and solve the problems we face using the gifts God has given them and the wisdom He so richly wishes to bestow – then remind the young people to thank God afterwards. This is such a positive message and one that puts God at the centre when so often He can be left out. Furthermore with respect to sustainable development I invite the students to reflect on what this might look like for the human soul – the activities they take part in, the things they watch, the friendships they make. In doing this we look at the effect, not just for the next thirty years, but also for eternity. The result of such an approach is to observe that holiness is the only sustainable lifestyle in the light of eternity.


Head Teacher’s Message

The following address was given by Richard Worsley to the Christian Fellowship School at the end of the Summer Term 2020:-

Due to technical difficulties, some of you would not have heard what I said in the final assembly so I have decided to give a summary of my message in this end of year head’s letter.

The Covid 19 crisis has caused many of us to ask God, “what are you wanting to say to us and to our nation at this time?” I felt that as a nation we had lost our way because we had abandoned truths that we once knew. I felt this message was confirmed when a parent explained to me what the Lord had spoken to them that morning as they were asking the Lord the same question. He felt the Lord gave him this verse from Jeremiah (6v16):-

Stand at the crossroads and look
Ask for the ancient paths
Ask where the good way is and walk in it
And you will find rest for your souls

Looking at the crossroads I identified 5 ancient truths that our nation has lost sight of and needs to return to. They are as follows:

  1. Fear of God. The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom (Proverbs 9v10) therefore we should not be surprised if the wisdom we gain from the Bible should be very different to the wisdom of a nation that has no fear of God (1Cor 1v25).
  2. Eternity​. Jesus said “What does it profit a person if they gain the whole world but lose their soul” (Mark 8v36). Without a sense of the eternal, as a nation we will set our sights on material objects and human pleasure (Col 3v1-6).
  3. Our Sinfulness​. The rich young ruler was challenged by Jesus when he called Him “Good teacher”. Jesus said “no one is good but one that is God” (Mark 10v18). We need to accept God’s verdict on our lives because if we accept our personal sinfulness (1 John 1v8-9) we will then truly enjoy the fourth truth.
  4. Full Forgiveness​. ‘Those who are forgiven much love much, but to whom little is forgiven, the same loves little’ (Luke 7v47). Our nation has rejected the concept of sin, instead it sees all humans as fundamentally good people suffering from bad circumstances. Circumstances do matter, but that is not the whole story.
  5. Holiness​. One thing we could not accuse our society of is a desire for holiness, yet holiness is one of the great requirements of the Bible (Heb 12v14 & 1 Peter 1v16). Fortunately for us, all the requirements of holiness can be found in Christ (1 Cor 1v26-31) and not in our natural selves.

Let us therefore pray for our nation at this difficult time that it will consider the ancient paths – the good way, and return to the truths it once knew.